Seeing Might Be Believing!

I’ve been blogging for years about the benefits of listening to classical music, and I’m happy to experiment on myself, but it’s sometimes hard to tell when something is working. However, being able to see a dramatic change in other Read More …

Mozart and Monet?

From a study by Waugh, Russell F. and Riddoch, Jane V.: There are few studies measuring the effects on painting quality of playing background classical music at special schools. Primary students with severe intellectual disabilities (N=24) were taught abstract painting Read More …

Serenity Now! for Athletes

From a study by Bock, O: It is well established that listening to music can modify subjects’ cognitive performance. The present study evaluates whether this so-called Mozart Effect extends beyond cognitive tasks and includes sensorimotor adaptation. Three subject groups listened Read More …

Mozart Effect Replicated, Again

From a study by Rideout BE, Dougherty S, and Wernert L: Previous attempts by various researchers to replicate the enhancement of spatial performance following 10 min. exposure to music have been inconsistent in their findings. In the present study 16 Read More …

Music Lessons Reorganize the Auditory Cortex

From a study by Pantev C, Lappe C, Herholz SC, and Trainor L: Learning to play a musical instrument requires complex multimodal skills involving simultaneous perception of several sensory modalities: auditory, visual, and somatosensory as well as the motor system. Read More …

Attention and Reaction More Balanced in Musicians’ Brains

From a study by Patston LL, Hogg SL, and Tippett LJ: Attention in neurologically intact adults normally errs towards the left side of space, as documented in studies involving tasks of visual attention (i.e., line bisection). The aim of this Read More …

More Activity in Musicians’ Brains

From a study by Grahn JA and Brett M: When we listen to rhythm, we often move spontaneously to the beat. This movement may result from processing of the beat by motor areas. Previous studies have shown that several motor Read More …

Learning to Play a Musical Instrument Increases Motor Skills After Stroke

From a study by Schneider S, Schönle PW, Altenmüller E, and Münte TF: In previous studies, it was shown that there is a need for efficient motor rehabilitation approaches. For this purpose, we evaluated a music-supported training program designed to Read More …

The Role of the Cerebellum

From a study by Neil Gordon: The most important function of the cerebellum may be to coordinate motor function so that movements can be performed smoothly, but there are others. It has been shown that the cerebellum is involved in Read More …